2018 and the Transitioning Labyrinth

new Year's day 2018 transition labyrinth kirkos helps mental health
Kirkos’ transition labyrinth 2018. Can you see me down there walking it?

My late father-in-law had a pedantic penchant for Latin. If he were alive today, he would describe 2017 as annus horribilis. And, I would agree with him. That’s not to say there wasn’t a bit of mirabilis in it, there was loads of that too, but it seemed that the hard stuff in life had its thumb on the scale in 2017.

As a consequence, I wasn’t feeling very reflective or hopeful when I woke up on the first day of 2018.  There is nothing magical about the turning of a new year.  There is nothing new or blank about it.  There is only the magic, and the new, and the blank we decide to bring to it.

So, around 3 pm when I went to meet friends at the tides-willing annual New Year’s Day transitioning labyrinth on the beach, I wasn’t expecting to do anything except recharge a little by watching and walking with my fellow Encinitas weirdos.  To be honest, there were some perfectly un-weird folk there as well, but I’m a sucker for weirdos. They are the light-bringers in my life.

The energy I was looking for was generated by a bunch of people massed around a labyrinth cut into the beach at low tide by a local artist.

public art improves mental health
Kirkos’ tools for creating the labyrinth

The artist, Kirkos, used his special tools to scrape the sacred geometry into the sand and the community came to decorate it with rocks and seaweed and sticks, Buddha statues and crystals and flowers, along with shells and rusted keys and random objects like the tiny gingerbread house with sliced banana for roof tiles.

Not unfamiliar with walking meditation, I finished exchanging New Year’s greetings with random and not random people and entered the labyrinth path intent on a peaceful walk to the center.

There are people in the labyrinth community who say the labyrinth is an ancient symbol that relates to wholeness.  I’m not so sure, but this one felt mystical. One of my favorite words to describe it is unicursal.  There is one way in and one way out.  Just like life.  And, just like life, this labyrinth was filled with a lot of people—some who made it harder to walk and some who made it easier.

new year's day labyrinth on beach
People making it easy to walk the labyrinth

I’ve been struggling to give up judging, but it’s hard to not judge when people bring their dogs to a crowded labyrinth on a no-dogs-allowed beach.  It makes it hard to stay on the path when a puppy is rampaging around it and disturbing the lines so carefully carved into the sand by the quirky old artist.  I breathed through my initial discomfort with the irresponsible dog owner (the puppy, of course, was innocent of any wrongdoing) and refused to consider it good or bad. I was somewhat successful.  I was more successful not judging the children running through the labyrinth.  They made it hard to walk as well, but they were just so fully being themselves, it was hard to be irritated with them.  When a parent apologized for one of them bumping me, I just smiled and said Happy New Year, then tried soaking up some of their enthusiasm for life.

As I walked, I tried to focus on the year just past. My plan was to think about 2017 on the way in and think about my intentions for 2018 on the way out.  I’m a little obsessive, and like things tied up in neat metaphorical packages.  But early on, I wasn’t able to focus on anything other than the people talking, and children playing, and the dog charging to the center with no regard for the path or the decorations placed at the line ends.  And, I couldn’t stop watching the ten-year old girl in the black hoody with cat ears on the hood and the words “I am a cat” emblazoned on the front.  I really wanted to be that girl for a moment.

I was also concerned the doggo would eat the gingerbread house, in which I had already invested a fair amount of emotional energy trying to figure out.  The banana slice roof tiles were odd, was it supposed to be a bird feeder?  Or was it purposely built to be healthy, and if so why does it have to be healthy if nobody is ever going to eat it?  If you are a health food extremist (we have a few in California) does that mean you can’t even use candy for decoration?  Or was it just a spur of the moment gingerbread house and the only thing handy to decorate it was yogurt covered pretzels and bananas?

gingerbread beach house new year's day labyrinth 2018
Gingerbread house decoration

This last one seemed most plausible to me, as it described my life when my children were still interested in building gingerbread houses. There may be only one way in and one way out of a labyrinth, but there are endless paths that my mind can take while my feet are walking it.

Frustrated that my mind wasn’t cooperating with my plans, much like my life doesn’t cooperate with my plans, I gave up when I saw my husband walk onto the beach with the camera. Like that adorably annoying dog, I ignored the path and lines and headed straight toward him.  He gave me the camera and told me he was headed to work to get some writing done.  As he was leaving, my son walked up with his friends.  We (and by we, I mean I) talked a little about leaving the hard part of the year on the labyrinth. Quickly tiring of my hippy mumbo jumbo, they left to pursue New Year’s tacos somewhere with less weirdos and less mom.

healing and mental health recovery through beauty and labyrinth
Distracting decoration on the lines of the labyrinth

In the course of this one-sided conversation, I became fascinated by the idea of leaving the hard shit of the year on the labyrinth and letting the ocean take it away as the tide erased the carvings from the beach. I knew I couldn’t actually get rid of the hard stuff, but maybe I could put it in a more productive place.

So, I quit thinking about the hard stuff and started listing it.  My son’s suicide attempt, the hours in the hospital listening to the monitor go off whenever he stopped breathing, my uncle’s death which brought peace to him and anguish to so many others,  the long wait at LAX when I was unsure if they would let my son on the plane and if so whether he was safe to be on the plane, the hurt and anger in my daughter’s eyes when her trip to visit colleges back east was canceled due to yet another mental health crisis, another trip to the emergency room listening to the fucking monitor stop and start again echoing my son’s erratic blood oxygen level,  my father’s emergency surgery, the lies, the fear, the careless words, the carefully constructed words used as weapons.

Every. Thing.

Everything I could remember.  Every feeling and action that caused pain or suffering or even mild discomfort,  I named it.  I looked at the year from my husband’s perspective and named all the shit.  I did the same from my daughter’s point of view, then my son’s.  Everything I could think of.

I listed it, acknowledged it, and willed it deep into the sand path I was walking.  I kept doing this as other walkers scooted past my slow walking pace, as children bumped me, as strangers said inane, belittling things about disruptions on the path misaligning chakras.  I felt the muck of 2017 crack like a hardening mud mask and begin to fall away.

walking labyrinth helps anxiety and mental health
Bird of Paradise decorating path of labyrinth

By the time I reached the center, I felt relieved of a burden. I felt lighter and almost content.  I began to notice the careful placement of shells and flowers.  The happy juxtaposition of the gaudy, natural bird of paradise flowers with the gaudy, unnatural plastic pin wheels.  My  lips curved into a smile without even trying.  And I began to recall some of the good as well.  I remembered the healing suicide prevention walk I did with my son, our time at The British Museum, our fairytale cottage in Meath, the inspiring women and charmed time that was my writers retreat, and the random happy accident of watching Loving Vincent together at La Paloma.

On the way out, I kept passing an older man with a few missing teeth and the unruffled demeanor of an Encinitas native.  We smiled at each other each time we crossed paths in the labyrinth.  He commented on how long the walk was.  I smiled, for me the walk was just long enough.  Once I made it out of the labyrinth, I looked up and noticed him walk to where the artist’s tools were sitting and begin to gather them up.  I realized the man I had been smiling at was the artist himself.

mindfulness labyrinth helps anxiety and mental health
Baby labyrinth set up beside the big one was new this year. Carved into the sand at the entrance to this one were the words Enter, Breathe, Pause.

I walked up to thank him for his effort and, as I shook his hand, he told me he usually doesn’t walk the labyrinth himself.  But for some reason he did this year and was surprised by how long the walk actually was.  I thought a moment about creating this space, this transient sacred geometry without even the intent to walk it yourself.   And when I looked back at his creation I saw his generosity multiply and bubble over in the faces of those participating in this private act of public art.

I told him I liked the addition of the two smaller labyrinths he added this year.  He nodded, thoughtful, and mumbled, “yes, each year it just keeps evolving.”  Which reminded me again, that labyrinths are very much like life.

 

(c) 2018 Gigi Quinn

A Christmas Card

hopeful christmas
Christmas came before I decorated the tree.

December 18th- the girl and I bought a tree

December 19th- the boy came home

December 20th- as I head to bed, I hear the boy and girl talking about physics and college and cats

I hear them laugh.  It seems silly to decorate the tree since Christmas came so early this year.

Thank you all for being part of my journey this year.  Wishing you everything that brings you joy this season.

(c) 2017 Gigi Quinn

5 Beautiful Ways to Survive the Holidays While Miserable

Are you overwhelmed by the holidays yet?

child fireplace mug family
Redefining meaningful holidays

Did you sit through Thanksgiving a little bit grateful but also a little bit sad? What if you are entering the holiday season in the midst of a crisis relating to your child’s chronic illness?  Or a loved one’s catastrophic diagnosis, PTSD or something else that makes you totally unfit to enter into the spirit of the season?

That’s me at the moment.  Thanksgiving has come and gone—even Nordy’s finally put up it’s Christmas decorations.  But here I am not feeling at all Christmassy.

What to do?

Well first, if you’re me, you check to see if Christmassy is really a word and if you have spelled it correctly.  Then you come up with rules to survive this season of joy, even though you feel like you haven’t been capable of joy in quite some time.

#1          Fake it

I was talking to my sister around Thanksgiving.  She was asking about my son who spent a few weeks in the hospital before being transferred to an inpatient treatment program.  When she asked how I was doing, I was too tired to be anything but honest.

Tired and sad.  Empty. That’s what I told her.

Shocked, she claimed I sounded so good.  She thought I was doing really well.

I told her I was faking it.

Sometimes when you act like you’re fine, happy even, you can trick your brain into believing it.  If it works, you can scrabble together some of the energy you need.  Even the simple act of smiling can trick your brain into thinking you’re happy.

This fake it ‘til you make it strategy is based, in some respects, on science (see, for instance, here or here), and I have found that it works pretty well to get through short term social engagements.  Especially those I want to go to, but don’t feel like I have the emotional stores to make it through dry-eyed.

This was the strategy I used for Thanksgiving.  Sad and tired notwithstanding, I wanted to go, I wanted it to be an occasion filled with love and laughter. So, I faked it.  I forced smiles and laughs until I was really smiling and laughing. As I faked my own joy, I was able to openly connect with my friends and family.  I was able to feel true delight at our friends’ engagement, real enjoyment in food lovingly prepared.  I left feeling genuinely thankful for so much.

One caveat, you have to make sure it’s the happiness you are faking.  It doesn’t work if you are just burying the sad you feel.  You have to honor the sad and then make a point to enjoy your time with family and friends.

 

#2          Lower the bar

I’ve been working on lowing my bar for a while.  I remember a few years ago I was asked how I was doing and instead of throwing out a reflexive, I’m fine, I thought for a second.  I realized both of my children spoke to me and that makes a great day.

Not good.  Great.

My expectations frame how I perceive my life.  So, I pare it down to the barest essentials.  Now, I don’t even need the kids to talk to me for it to be a great day.  Today, it’s just that the kids are alive.  And, given the fragility of life, I know it’s possible I may have to lower it even further.

“But, Gigi,” you say, “my bar is already on the ground, how can it get even lower?” And to that I say, “get a shovel.”  It can always be lower.

 

#3          Re-evaluate your priorities

Just because you have always had a Christmas/Solstice/Hanukkah party at your house, doesn’t mean you have to have one this year.  Just because your family loves your version of holiday feast, doesn’t mean you can’t just go to Red Tracton’s and let them do the cooking, serving and cleaning up.  Take a look at your holiday traditions.  Decide which ones have real meaning to you.

For me, it’s always been the tree.

girl christmas tree presents holiday
My perfect tree, long ago and far away

I have a tree decorating ritual, complete with cookies and champagne.

It’s a little obsessive, I admit.  After the tree is up, I string the lights, then wind the ribbon around it.  Next, the angel goes on the top.

After that, the kids get their new ornament.  We give them one each year, even now that they are 16 and 19.  My mom did this as I grew up. When she finally sent them to me after I got married, I relished putting them onto my adult tree.  It acknowledged my old traditions at the same time I began creating new ones with my husband.

She continued this tradition giving each grandchild an ornament every year.  Now, we each have our own large collection.  We take turns placing them on the tree until it’s full and my husband says we have too many and need to scale back.  After that, I try to balance the aesthetic and fill in the holes with the red blown glass balls which my husband claims don’t fit.  Then we stand back and admire our work.

That’s it.  A perfect holiday for me.  We have done this exactly the same for 18 years or so. I thought it was required to make our holiday perfect.

Until last year.

Last December I was barely functional. I was dealing with migraines, and vertigo and my own mental health issue.  School carpool and my doctor’s appointments were almost the only reasons I would leave the house.

It was our first half-assed Christmas.  The tree went up just a few days before Christmas, we didn’t even decorate it until Christmas Eve.  No cookies, no champagne, no pictures.  No ribbon, just lights.  We picked out a few ornaments and didn’t bother with the rest.  And even though there was plenty of room, the blown glass balls stayed in their box.

And I still had a perfect holiday.

It wasn’t the ritual or completed tree that was important.  It was just us being in this together.  That space of time we took to be with each other.  I recently talked to the boy about last year’s half-assed tree and he remembered it as a great tree.

We will probably have a half-assed Christmas this year too.  I’m redefining perfect in ways that have nothing to do with gifts, decorations and traditions, and instead revolve around space and time carved out to be grounded with those I love.

crane in lagoon at christmas
What I do with my crew instead of shopping

Sometimes half-assed is perfect, you just need to reevaluate your definition. Distill what you need to make meaning of this season.  You will be amazed by how much you can let go.

 

 

#4          Give your time to your community

Time is always a precious commodity during the holiday season.  The theory of relativity never seems to work in my favor in December.  But if you spend your time helping others, it can ground you in the meaning of the season.  And, if you’ve followed number 3 above, you will have lots more of it.

It’s sounds counter intuitive, but it is backed up by science.  Volunteering has positive effects on the volunteers mental and physical health.  (like this from Harvard).  Do yourself a favor and take a shift at a local food pantry, organize a toy drive for foster kids, take time to play with some Head Start kids.  Smile at strangers.

#5          Quit reading lists of how to survive the holidays.

Breathe, you got this.

 

(c) 2017 Gigi Quinn

Revising Myself on a Writer’s Retreat

Bean Hollow State Beach

The stones and shell already crowded my pocket by the time I saw the sign forbidding it.

Rock for the boy, shell for the girl

But it didn’t matter.  This was my renegade week.  There were 13 women back at the cabin to prove it.  All of us had wandered away from life to wonder a while with words. And each other.

I hadn’t really wandered.  I had flown away to be with them.  In community.  But here I stood, alone on the beach, with purloined rocks and one shell.

I was a mere shadow of myself, wondering where I had disappeared to.

A mere shadow of myself

I wasn’t surprised.  His disease had been erasing me slowly for years.  Yet, it was a shock to see the process almost complete. I had thought there was more of me left.

I put the stones in my pocket to weigh me down.  To keep me from floating away on the wind.  I would take the small stone and shell home with me in a few days, one for each child.

The other stone was for Shanna.  Because I had her truck and thought she needed a tangible reminder that this week was ours.  A smooth polished black pebble, with a thin white vein, to remind us that the hard is necessary to see the light.

As if we needed reminding.  I should have grabbed a pebble for everyone in the cabin.  We had all lived that lesson in some form, it’s part of what connected us.  But I couldn’t leave with thirteen illegal pebbles.  I’m not that much of a renegade.

Yet.

Cairn for Sarah

I wanted to bring one for Sarah.  Since, when the numbness finally wore off, she hugged me and made me cry on purpose, and she poured me a shot instead of hitting me, and because she listened to Graceland in the kitchen while cooking.  But, I didn’t want to trivialize this with a thing.  Instead, I stacked a cairn for her and added the weight of the view to the stones already in my pocket.

I felt myself fill.

Ring my Bell

And when I got back to the cabin, I grew fuller.  Not because I wrote- I didn’t- but because I read these women’s words.  And laughed at their jokes, and cried at their losses, and railed against their pain.  I breathed in the glee of their delight as if we had all just received word of a newborn nephew. And I meditated with their voice until I could feel every disparate part of my body connect, and I was substantial again.

 

Filled

Until intimacy and inside jokes overfilled my pockets and gold filled the cracks in my chest.

 

(c) 2017 Gigi Quinn

What we got in Ireland

One day, in Ireland we got to…

Do-overs, respites, reprieves, escapes, resets.  I’ve been hoping for one or more of these to fall from the sky and hit me over the head (gently) for a few months now.

Q:  What do you get when you take a child in the middle of a mental health crisis to Ireland?

A: You get to hang out in Ireland with a child in the middle of a mental health crisis.

That’s it.  No escape, no reset, no reprieve, no respite, certainly no do-over.

It was an insane, wonderful, excruciating, beautiful, tragic, sublime mess.  When I described it that way to my aunt, she said, “Oh, so you got family.”

What I really needed, what my husband really needed, was about a week to sleep and do nothing—think about nothing, worry about nothing.  What we got was anxiety troubles on one side and addict misadventure on the other.  And sandwiched in between were some profound moments of beauty, joy, and simple fun.

I guess we just got life, but we got life in Ireland.

The boys got to surf. While they did, I got to have a cuppa with a salty Irish pensioner, her dog and her sheep sitting at her tiny table in her  home overlooking the beach.

Ahhhhh Kerry

I listened to her rail against American golf course developers ruining the beauty and environment of her community.  I heard about the relative merits of surfers over golfers, the importance of protecting the soil, the surf, the fish, the hares.  We were totally simpatico.  I got to see beautiful pictures of her house, the beach, the waves.  I saw her life displayed on her walls and was overwhelmed by the generosity of this woman who took a stranger into her home.  She fed me tea and cake while she shared her heart with me.  I felt my anxiety melt away as she treated this stranger like a friend.

We got to meet new surf friends at a local pub.  Then I saw the boy walk out of the pub and talk to our new friend about her son who is fighting his own teenage fight.  I saw her return and look a little less alone.  I felt the world shrink as I connected in the delight and fear of that moment.

My son and I got to walk around the top of a ring fort in a mist that was turning to rain, feeling as free and wild as the iron age individuals who called it home 1700 years ago.  Then we took a selfie.

Staigue selfies

I got to stay up with my son almost all night as he suffered.  Watching him impotently, as his body refused to be comfortable, as he paced unrelieved then switched to sitting unrelieved.  Watching his weariness, his exhaustion, his fear that this was forever.

We saw sheep.  Spray painted sheep.  Tagged sheep.  Lots of sheep.

Just a few of the many, many, many sheep

And green.  Enough green to quench our desert-living souls.

We got to pay extortion prices to hike up to “the best views in Kerry” and found the best views in Kerry.  Rugged, beautiful, drenched in deep color.  Some of the most beautiful landscape I have ever seen.

We got to see a donkey there too.  Just a little bonus.

The seas were too rough for the boat to Skellig Michael to run, the one thing that I had really wanted to do on this trip.  And yet I wasn’t disappointed at all with our visit to Kerry.

A Kerry donkey bonus

I got to hear from my daughter that she had just seen the professional Riverdance production at the Gaity theater in Dublin.  She told me it was surreal.  I think it may have been her best use of that word to date.  She got to spend a week dancing with some of those professionals and capped the week off by performing with them on stage at the Gaity herself.  When I read her Instagram post afterward, I got to learn it was “one of the best weeks” of her life and she was overwhelmed with gratitude toward the @riverdance professionals who made it possible.  She wants to do it again next year, and next time there will be no audition required.

I got to fall on some steps in an Irish downpour and ended up with a hematoma on my ass the size of a papaya.  My son couldn’t find ice so he brought me frozen brussels sprouts to help with the pain.  It slowed me down.  I needed to be slowed down.  We played cards and drank whiskey until the three of them left me to my pain and frozen sprouts to find dinner in Dublin.  They brought me back Chinese.

Kilmainham Gaol on a sunny day. Cross marks the execution site of the leaders of the Easter Uprising

We explored art, literature, the Easter uprising, Cromwell, and Wilde.  Some of us enjoyed it more than others and then others got their turn to enjoy.  It wasn’t perfect but it was right.  The boy and I stumbled upon a Vermeer exhibit at the national gallery.  We got to spend a little bit of time in heaven while the girl and her father did a walking tour of the uprising.

We drank tea with sugar and milk.  We got to drink lots of tea.

We realized we should have allowed ourselves an entire day for Glendolough.  We got to see a rainbow on our way to Meath.  When we got to  the end of the rainbow, we realized we should have allowed ourselves 4 days at our fairytale cottage in Slane.

Fairytale cottage owned by the great-granddaughter of Maude Gonne

I got to watch the girl light up when she saw the romantic cottage on the river.  I saw the boy relax when the cottage cat adopted him and followed him to his room, where they stayed and played until dinner.  I laughed on the second morning when I knew the cottage cats had accepted us by the dead mouse offerings on the path to the cottage.

Cici, the cottage kitten

We were all melancholy as we said goodbye to our fairytale cottage.  When we got to London in a torrential downpour and found our raincoats leaked, and we only had one umbrella, and the rain hitting our phones screwed up our navigation, and we didn’t have a paper map, and the queue at the British Museum was 2 hours long; we did the only reasonable thing we could and ducked into the first restaurant with an open table and ordered Irish coffees.

I have a feeling that everyone else in the family would describe our arrival in London very differently.  Grumpy doesn’t begin to describe the mood of the table that afternoon at the Savoir Faire in Bloomsbury.  But to me it was how we dealt with it that was important, not what actually happened.  We got to deal with it by eating sticky toffee pudding.

We got to see London improve in the sunshine, as London does.  We got to introduce our children to our friends who had never met them.  We met and spent time with our friends’ children.  We celebrated our 26th wedding anniversary (both ours and theirs) with champagne in the garden.  We got to remember why we love spending time with them.

We got to hang out with our child in the middle of a mental health crisis. We got our wonderful, tragic, woeful, beautiful family together.  We got life.  But we got life in Ireland.

Peace at Rock of Cashel

I think we got lucky.

(c) 2017 Gigi Quinn

One Step, Two Steps, Breathe

I don’t have pictures from Mother’s Day last week.  We didn’t have any special celebration.

We are fragile.  We are feeling fragile.  We are not up to noise, or cheer, or talking.  We are over talking.

For the moment.

So we went to the mountain that is not really a mountain.  And we held hands while we walked silently.

One step, two steps, breathe in.  One step, two steps, three steps, breathe out.

Hand in hand with the two who define my motherhood.  Left foot, right foot, left foot, right foot.

When I got distracted by my thoughts, I just went back to left foot, right foot.  I realized I still mix up my right and my left.  I laughed.

When our hands got sweaty we released and walked on our own.  Left foot, right foot. Someone behind me was talking about cats. I got annoyed.  The only directions we received:  no talking.  I needed to get back to walking.  I had to let my annoyance float away. It was hard.

One step, two steps, breathe.

I missed the soft skin of their hands in my hands, I reached for one again.  I felt love, and family, and peace.  I remembered a book, Peace is Every Step.  How long ago had I read it?  Why wasn’t I reading it now? I let it go and went back to my walking.

One, two steps, breathe in.

My husband’s knee couldn’t make it up the hill so we were three, not four. There were over a hundred of us, but for me it was only us three.  Warming up as the sun melted the mist, and breathing harder as we headed up a steeper hill.  I got tired, but still I walked and counted and breathed.  The road was rough and pocked with holes and ruts. The hand I held steadied me.  A subtle role reversal, but I noticed.

One, two, three steps, breathe out.

I thought about the Dharma talk we had just heard.  Imagined finding the baby Buddha inside me, waiting for me. Like honey inside a swarm of bees, he said.  Isn’t that nice? Or the seed hidden in the very depths of the flower.  Much nicer I thought.

We are all mothers of the baby Buddha inside us, he said.   We just need to have a clear mind and access, and…  And something else he said.  I couldn’t remember.  The talk was peppered with words in a different language, in an accent I couldn’t quite penetrate.  Like looking through a dusty window and trying to comprehend the beauty of the meadow on the other side.  I could make out the shape and color of the flower that was his talk, but couldn’t quite see its delicate structure or catch its scent.

Come back, breathe, walk.

A few people stopped walking and began staring at the bushes, pointing out something they had seen to others.  I thought of the sign posted on the way in, “Be mindful of toxic snakes and insects” it said.

I love that sign.  Every time I pass it I want to take a picture.  But I never do.

Right foot, left foot.  Be mindful of rattlesnakes.

Then we continued down, down, to harmony grove.

I guess the girl got a picture or two

A small stand of trees beside a dry creek bed.  Flowers were everywhere.  A small statue waited to be washed with flowers and water. Everyone had the opportunity to pour the sweet water on the statue.  The symbolic bathing of a child, the nurturing of the peace within us.

When we met back up with my husband, their father, we were indeed home. We had arrived.  And, in that step, there was peace.  And maybe we were a little less fragile.

 

(c) 2017 Gigi Quinn

11 things you absolutely must remember in a mental health crisis—number 5 will shock you!

1. No mascara. Unless it’s water proof.  Then you’re good to go, but you won’t get to wash your face for about 48 hours so frankly waterproof mascara is really not your friend.  I stick with my original advice.  No mascara.

2. Just hang up. During a crisis, you will find yourself answering all phone calls even if you don’t recognize the number.  This behavior itself is enough to throw your world totally off kilter.  You will be getting calls from doctors, social workers, case managers, treatment centers etc. You won’t recognize any of these numbers so you will end up answering all calls just so you don’t have to continue to play phone tag with the social worker.  Therefore, you will eventually pick up a call from a telemarketer.

It will be your first instinct to be polite.  You may say something like “my son is in the hospital, and I am waiting for a call from the doctor so I can’t talk right now.”  Don’t expect them to go away.  They have a script, they make minimum wage, they will just reply, “it will only take a moment”.  You may even find yourself saying, “my child is in the hospital because he attempted suicide and I can’t talk right now.”  Then they will say something like, “I’m sorry, but we really want to make sure you have all the cable services you want and let you know about some great promotional offers that are available to you.”

If you had followed my advice you would have already hung up.  If not you will kind of disassociate and see yourself actually saying, “did you understand that I just told you my son tried to kill himself?”  Then you will see yourself react as the telemarketer replies, “my condolences, but this will just take a moment.”  Just hang up and save yourself the futile exercise of trying to figure out if your cable company is run by the minions of hell.

3. Don’t answer your door. The same scenario as above will play out, but this time it will be a single mother trying to get back on her feet by selling magazines and you will have to go back to rule number one: no mascara.

4. Don’t post shit on social media. Just don’t.  It’s not your friend right now.  That being said, watching kitten videos, giraffe births, or panda babies can offer great relief.  Otters too,  don’t forget the otters.

5. One glass of wine during crisis = 10 normal glasses. Plan accordingly.

6. Ask your other child if they have perhaps agreed to take care of anybody’s pets. It may not help, but you will be prepared when the cats haven’t been fed in 2 days and they call you.

7. Get horizontal. No matter how strong you have been in each crisis leading up to this (and you know there have been a lot), your body may yell “Enough!”  You will feel a little dizzy and then you will see a long black tunnel.  This is a vagal faint.  It’s not a big deal unless you refuse to get horizontal on your own. Because your body will absolutely insist.  The floor is a pretty hard landing surface.

8. Apologize when lack of sleep, overwhelming anxiety, and constant nausea lead you release your inner bitch.

9. Listen, and don’t take it personally when lack of sleep, overwhelming anxiety, and constant nausea lead your loved ones to release their inner bitches.

10. Be gentle with yourself and your family. Hug as much as you are able.

11. Breathe

(c) 2017 Gigi Quinn

Dragon Slaying 101—What I Do When I Can’t Do It Anymore

I try to be mindful as I drive, let thoughts come and go as they please, but I’m not always successful.  So tears tend to hit while I’m driving. When I am alone with my thoughts the reality of what is ahead grabs me and yanks until the knot pulls so tight it can never be undone.  And that reality is the fact that this is my new normal.  One moment walking happily along feeling like all is on the right track, the next being smacked in the face with the fact that things are very, very not okay.  Suicide, overdose, death from anorexia—these all are not unreasonable ends to our story.

But so is recovery.

Recovery is not an unreasonable end to our story.

And that is my new normal.  The fact that one is just as likely as the other.  Or if not just as likely, they are all as much out of my control.

So, I really try to hold onto the hope of recovery, especially in the midst of relapse.  But I am not sure that there is anything I can do to influence the outcome.  I used to think there was, but I’m beginning to think that there is nothing I can do to make it better, the only real influence I have is to make it worse.

And that, more than anything, terrifies me.  How am I making it worse?  How am I coddling?  How am I enabling?  How am I helicoptering?

What is the line between any of those and compassion when faced with your child in agony?

My child, a heartbreakingly depressed young man trying to hold on.  And trying to move forward.

Yesterday I came home from one of these driving episodes crying.  Distraught over this relapse, this new normal of ours.   I collapsed on my husband’s chest and sobbed, “I can’t do this.”

He looked at me and said “Yes. You can.”

My initial response was a snort acknowledging the cold comfort of the truth.  Then I let my thoughts wander for a minute and remembered a recent phone call with a friend.

Of course, we can do this, we are already doing it, she reminded me.   And we have been doing it for some time now.

This is our new normal.  This working and fighting for recovery.  For wellness.  For peace.

And she is right.  We are doing this.  We have been doing this for almost 4 years.  And we can keep on doing this.

I can do this with my friends who are in the same boat (or at least a similar one) with me.  I can do this with my friends who have been there all along.  I can do this with my new friends who have come my way because of this journey.  I can do this with my husband of over 25 years.  It doesn’t matter that we aren’t on the same page.  Sometimes just reading the same book is enough.

 

I looked at my husband again and said, “I don’t want to do this.”  And this is true as well.  I don’t want this to be my reality.  I want a different normal back.  Of course, this is where the friction lies.  This is where I get caught up over and over again.  This is what saps my energy.

Instead of fighting for recovery I am fighting against what is.

Intellectually, I know this is senseless, but my emotions won’t be won over by petty things like facts.

So, I go back to my DBT workbook again.  I review, redo, reevaluate the handouts on radical acceptance, and say to myself, “our son has a serious mental health disorder that could lead to his death.”

Take a breath.  Figure out what to do with that.

And I remind myself again that this acceptance doesn’t mean I am okay with it.  Doesn’t mean I am happy about it.  It just means that this is what my life is at the moment.  This is part of what my life is.  This is the reality that I have to work with.

It doesn’t mean anything, it is just my current reality.  So, I start again.  I start again reviewing my skills, my supports. I start again practicing skills that build my resilience.  I start again practicing skills to take care of myself, to keep myself well.  I start again learning boundaries, and emotional regulation, and effectiveness.  I start again researching ways forward that we haven’t thought of before.

I start again.

And again.

And again.

I can do this.  I am doing this.  I will continue to do this. As messy and inelegant and as hard as it is.

I can do it because my child is worth the fight. Because my family is worth the fight.  Because I am fightworthy, even when I can’t do this.

(c) 2017 Gigi Quinn

More dandelion moments please

My daughter’s away. Off on an east coast adventure with her cousins. Her aunt keeps sending me pictures of her hiking in the woods, swinging on swings, playing with bugs. Doing all sorts of things that my almost grown daughter would never do around home.

I miss her.

I mean, I miss her physical presence, but I know that she will be back in a few weeks.

But what I really miss is the old her.

several feet above the water
several feet above the water

I miss her uninhibited spirit that is becoming more and more hidden as she grows up. She went from the girl who skipped everywhere to the girl who points out how silly it is that a little girl is skipping on her way to school. She went from the girl who is happy in her own skin to the one worried about what strangers will think.

From the girl who never minded making a ruckus to the one that shushes me.

She shushes me.

I never thought I would be the one getting shushed.

I miss that she is showing a little, tiny bit of that spirit again, and I am not around to see it. To breath it in and capture it in the way I was too careless to do when she was four.

Back then, I told her I was going to write down all of the wonderful words she made up and call it her Fantabulous Fictionary. But I got busy and I knew I would remember them because they were all so wonderful.

We all know what happened.

I only remember a few now. Beesgusting: means even worse than disgusting, Gianormous: a little mixture of giant and enormous for extra emphasis, and Tinky: same as stinky.

Ok, the last one wasn’t really a made up word, she had a speech impediment and couldn’t say the ST sound. She also couldn’t say the TH sound so she pronounced it as S.

And that is how she came up with my favorite noun:

Me: Please don’t blow dandelions all over the lawn, daddy works hard to keep our lawn dandelion free without chemicals.

Her: But mommy, these aren’t dandelions, they are wishing sings.

Wishing sings, wishing things, dandelions. I’ve never looked at a lawn full of them the same way since.

And when I see one now there is always a little girl in it.

With a halo of blonde curls. In a pink seersucker dress and grey eyes busy, busy, busy taking in her world.

This vision is as clear as a photograph. Seared in my mind along with the words of the conversation. Because it was one of those events that hurled me right into the moment. Like a cable was hooked to me and I was physically dragged to another place.

The right place.

I can’t imagine what my state of mind was when I told my 4 year old not to blow a dandelion. But I know that after that moment I looked at the things she did through a different lens.

It was one of those clear moments of parenting when you realize what you are doing and what you should be doing.

But I’m a slow learner it seems and I wasn’t always able to recognize those moments when they came.

not dandelions
not dandelions

Yet, now I see this girl in the middle of a field of flowers and I know it will be gone soon as well. I want more dandelion moments, but it’s too late.

She is only 15, but she has flown away. I have to focus on the moments now, knowing they are what I have.

They are all I have.

And if I pay attention, they are enough.

(c) 2016 Gigi Quinn

Adult in the making

So the boy turned 18 and the earth didn’t end.  Or shake.  Or change at all really.  It just went on spinning, taking several more turns around the sun, and the son seemed to take it all in stride.

A few weeks later he graduated.

It seems a milestone has been reached.  I’ve technically lived up to my parental responsibilities.  Although practically, I’m fairly certain you are never done as a mother.

grad 5
the son took it all in stride

I think he may have been expecting something more definitive. Myself, I was just sort of relieved.

So he is an adult now.  But there wasn’t some magical switch thrown that will allow him to make “adult” decisions.  It didn’t come with an extra tool box filled with “adult” tools.  He still has what he had, still is what he was the day before, and yet he is different.

The perspective is different.

The expectations are different; the social contract has totally changed.

He has rights that he can exercise if he chooses.  He has responsibilities that he must take on now, and some he can let slide until he is in college.  The Selective Service reminded him of one of these with a letter that arrived on his birthday.  The county registrar of voters reminded him of another when his first official election ballot arrived in the mail.

I see him picking up those responsibilities, and more, in fits and starts.  I’m hoping that he takes them a little more seriously than he takes his responsibility to clean is room.

Currently, it appears that he does.

When he was signing the consent forms at a post birthday doctor appointment, I could see him come to the realization that he is now in control of his health decisions and his information.  He had a detailed discussion with the doctor about what would be disclosed to me if he chose to sign the consent and what would be the practical implications if he didn’t.

He joked about sending me out of the room.

He really meant it though.

grad 7
funny, they don’t look like adults

I’m glad he resisted.  He is an adult, but we are still on this journey together.

He has a new lens for viewing his decisions, and I can see it is empowering to him. It’s exciting to see him finish one journey and prepare for another with this new view, and watch him adjust to what he expected and what actually is.   I can also see the Pandora’s box aspect of it, but that is something that I gave up thinking about a while ago.

We have never tried to protect him from the real world and real world consequences, figuring that learning from them is the easiest way to go about learning to adult. Although, we have tried to incorporate mercy into the process as well.

His journey has been more fraught with danger and more torturous than we would have ever wished for.  But he has risen to the occasion that no child should have to (and yet so many must) with more resilience and fortitude than I could have imagined.

My sister is in the same temporal place with her son, but she told me she has been crying lately.  I understand that, but I’m not there.  It is an amazing thing about trauma, it drags you into reality—ready or not.  It challenges ingrained behaviors and pushes you to see other perspectives.

I guess I would have preferred the slow, dawning realization.  Perhaps I would have found myself crying gently at the thought of his next adventure and tiptoeing cautiously between his 18th birthday and his graduation date.

Melancholy and excitement sharing the same space.

But that was not to be. I’ve already had to say good bye to so much during this recovery process, I feel like I have already done a large portion of the work of leaving the boy he was behind.

And at the same time I am able to hold on to that boy and realize, he is who he has always been.  His diagnosis doesn’t change who he is, it doesn’t define him.

Like all of us, only this moment defines him. And in a second, it will be a different moment. His actions will demonstrate his heart, his inner light, his joy.  As he has done in the past, he will make mistakes and, hopefully, he will not let them define him anymore than he allows the labels people try to attach to him.

And although his childhood has come to an end, I find myself hoping that he won’t totally lose the childhood perspective on life.

The possibility, hope and anticipation of his four-year-old self.  I want that to stay with him, to be in a place where he can find it when he needs it most.  I know he is going to need it.

A few years ago he asked me what I wanted him to be when he grew up.  “I want you to be happy” I replied.  “I may have some ideas about what will make you happy, but in the end, you don’t have to do them, you just have to find your own way to happy.”

I probably could have given more specific hopes and goals but I couldn’t have given more honest ones.  I truly don’t care what he does with his life as long as he finds fulfillment and meaning.  As long as he creates joy and lives happy.  Accepting that sometimes you have to slog through the hard to just even taste the good.  As long as he makes his journey count.

Although I know those are all subjective and judgy, I’m pretty sure I will know

taking in the moment
taking in the moment

them when I see them.

He has the advantage (or perhaps disadvantage) of knowing that life is not always easy, things are not always fair, sometimes you get dealt a bad hand, and you just have to go with it and make the best of it.  He is farther along the road to happiness than many adults I know just having that simple building block.

My aspirations for him seem to be crystalizing.  Not so much because of his birthday, but because of the journey he has selected.  And because I have let go of what I wanted or thought I wanted.  I have followed his lead and am just taking in the moment.

(c) 2016 Gigi Quinn